Author Interview: J.H. Mull

image001J.H. writes in several genres so to give him a label just doesn’t cut it, so let’s just say he’s multi-genre-al.  His latest novel is Touching Home, the second book in his series about Jack Hundo Lane.

He’s currently doing research for a series he’s working on titled Confederate Breed, based on two of his ancestors and their experiences in the Civil War and life afterward.

He lives on the Georgia coast with his wife and soul mate as well his cat, Snowflake. He’s held a variety of positions from army officer and CIA operative to stock broker and electrical engineer.

Ready to learn more about J.H.?  Well here we go…


1.  What genre do you write and why?

I write Contemporary Fiction to Erotica and everything in between, whatever I’m interested in at the time. And I write under several pseudonyms, only recently have I published under my name–J. H. Mull.

2.  What character from a book you read or wrote would you love to meet?

Stuart Woods character Stone Barrington. My characters? Well, that’s hard, because most are based on people I know and have known.

3.  What is the best review you’ve ever gotten?

Five stars for A Captain’s Story. The reviewer said she cried at the ending.

4.  Who has been the most supportive person of your writing?

Easy, my wife and soul mate. She, an English Major from the University of Georgia, is my editor, and my biggest critic. She keeps me from having three arms in my writing or two left feet, even a foot long tongue sometimes.

5.  Do you have any other talents besides writing?

I sketch, paint, and make up stories. A young boy can have any outcome he wants in a story he constructs. Writing is my third career. The first, the U.S. Army, the second, a stock broker with several major investment firms.

6.  What is the hardest thing about writing a book?

The ground work that goes before I start writing. If one is going to write a western he best know about horses, how to saddle one, how to ride one, and what to feed one. I’m not a pantster I do an outline, a timeline, and character sketches before I start writing. But then that’s when the fun begins.

7.  Where do you find the most inspiration for your writing?

My family and my own experiences mostly. My Great…….great grandmother, Mary Elsberry, and her two sons left London with General Oglethorpe in 1732. They landed in what is now Savannah, Georgia in 1733. Her great, great grandson married a Creek Native American in 1833 and lay claim to ten thousand acres in North Georgia. He was my great, great grandfather. My family has fought in every war our country has waged since the beginning—sometime not on the winning side. I have fought for my country on three continents. Rhodesia being one place. Like I said not always on the winning side.

8.  What is the best passage you have ever written?

The best and most difficult was the paragraph describing the killing of Michelle in An Occasional Warrior. I must add, the funniest is a scene in Sex, Money, and Betrayal, describing a real estate agent having sex with a developer. She gets her foot caught under the gas pedal in his SUV as they are in his front seat, then gets her leg wedged between the seat and his door. That’s when they discover three young boys are watching.

9.  Is there any real life person/event that has inspired you to create a book/story/character?

Easy—my grandfather. What a character he was. He was born six years after Custer was killed by the Sioux at the Little Big Horn. He was a Creek Indian, scouting for General Pershing, when he went into Mexico after Poncho Vila in 1916. He was the first Indian elected sheriff in Georgia. He had five children and ran a farm, all while working as a trouble shooter for the railroad. He was a character!

10.  What is your advice for newbie authors?

Look inside yourself to see what you have to write about—write about what you know. I know this is an old thing but true. If you grew up on a ranch you know how to saddle a horse, how to ride one, and how to take care of one.

11.  How many stories have you written?

Under my own name, six. Under pen names over sixty.

12.  Who is your favorite character you’ve created and why?

It would have to be Jack Hundo Lane, who is mostly based on my experiences in the military and the intelligence service.


And to top off this interview, I leave you with a tease of J.H.’s book, Touching Home.  Hope you enjoyed the interview!  Check out his book and give this post some likes to show some love.  Come on…you know you wanna!

“Ain’t no use leaning on that horn. I could hear that ratty truck of yours coming a mile off. How you doing, Patrick?” John said, coming out of the barn. The lean, wiry man, as tall as Pat, had a flat, hard stomach and grinned as he walked toward his friend, drying his hands on a well-worn cloth. His skin was dark and weathered like Pat’s. They were both Upper Creeks.

“Fine, John. You?” Pat looked at his hands. “Problem?”

“Can’t complain. I’m alive.” He held out his hand. “My mare’s having a hard time with the foal.”

“Good. Need help with the mare?”

Annie jumped down from her seat and went around to Pat, clutching his leg tightly.

“Might, but she won’t come until around midnight.” He turned his attention to Annie. “Cute kid. Ain’t yours though—whose is she?”

“No, but I’m all she’s got. Jack sent her to me. I’ll come back around then.”

“I’d appreciate the help. She ain’t his neither. How’d he come by her?”

“That young pretty veterinarian coming?”

“Yeah, but she’s a small woman. Won’t be much help if we have to pull the foal.”

“Don’t sell her short. She’s a good vet.” Pat smiled. “Jack bought the girl in Bangkok for five dollars.”

“I thought he was in Vietnam?” John took out his makings and rolled a cigarette.

“He is. Does it matter? She’s here now.”

“Guess not. Five dollars? Got a good price—that can’t be more than ten cents a pound.”

“That’s about right.”

“What’s she good for?”

“Doting over’s about all, so far.”

“Well, she’s a cute little thing. What’s your name, little sister?”

“She doesn’t speak a word of English. Somehow she seems to understand sign language.”

“Do say.” John squatted down and took out a stick of gum. He held it out and signed to Annie. She stepped forward far enough to take the gum, then moved back to Pat’s side. “Well, I’ll be damn. She’s smart.” He stood.

Author Interview: Virginnia De Parté

“By writing about the future I have the pleasure of waiting for science and technology to catch up with my imagination.”

-Virginnia De Parté

LovesRedHeart_SMVirginnia is the author of Love’s Bright Star, Love’s Red Heart and A Talent for Loving, all three books part of a series about genetically altered humans.  Besides writing futuristic romances, she also writes poetry, haiku and tanka.

I asked her some questions to get to know her better.  Read on and find out more about Virginnia. 


1. What genre do you write and why?

I write futuristic romance about genetically altered people. I find it easier to design situations, imagine technical advancements and create the quirks of genetically altered people – than to write in the ‘here and now’ and have the story become dated within a year.

2. Why do you write?

I’ve always written long emails, long letters, long messages, and had a fertile imagination. At last I have found space in my life to indulge myself and put all the characters that inhabit my head, out on paper.  They write their own stories, once I get them started.

3. Do you have any other talents besides writing?

Yes, I spun wool fibre and knitted the yarn for many years. Because I became bored with white, brown and grey fleeces I took up dyeing the spun yarn and moved on to dyeing other fibres and threads from there. I’ve spent time as a quiltmaker, using my dyed fabrics – but all that has been abandoned to allow me more time to write.  I also write poetry and try to use this skill in my prose, without overdoing it.

4. What is your advice to newbie authors?

Persevere, don’t give up. Be brave!  You have to be brave to put your work out for the world to read. Before it gets to the world’s stage you have to allow it to be critiqued. You need fresh eyes to read it and spot the plot holes and errors.  You have to take this on the chin, make the corrections and try harder. You wouldn’t send your child on stage dressed in ripped untidy clothes, messed hair, and scuffed shoes. Neither should you let your manuscript be viewed as a final edition until it has been polished for typos, grammar, spelling (American v. English), and other errors, such as point of view changes and change of tense.

5. Who is your favorite character you’ve created and why?

It must be Stella Corban, granddaughter of William and Belinda, daughter of James and Siobhan. She can become invisible behind her rainbow curtain; jump between locations (like her grandfather); and “see’ the people she cares about when they’re troubled.  She is tall, graceful (cat genes from her mother) has blue/green eyes with a hint of lavender (from her grandmother). She is loyal and caring and the safety of the family is her priority as she lives and works among ‘normals. ’

She is a newborn in Love’s Bright Star, a six year old in Love’s Red Heart, and I am presently writing her romance, in which her love for a ’normal’ could put her family’s safety at risk if he discovers she is genetically altered.


ATalentforLoving_SMAnd to end the interview I leave you with an excerpt from Virginna’s, A Talent for Loving

She looked at him as he gazed out to sea. His thick brown hair hugged his head and small curls tucked around his ears. She tightened her arm around his waist and leaned into his chest. So far the day has been lovely. The view from the touring bus was so much better with higher expansive views than travelling the Great Ocean Road by car. There’d been several stops for photo opportunities, but this pause in the journey allowed everyone an hour to walk and explore, to feel the sand between their toes, and fill their lungs with ozone-laden sea air

“The surf’s building. There’s a blow on the way.” He pointed to the south. “See the breakers out there? They’re coming closer by the minute. I bet the wind gets up when they get closer to shore.”

She followed his gaze and looked out to sea before glancing back to the surf below them. Could that black dot be a seal? Or was it a surfer in a wetsuit? Oh God! No! She shook his arm and prodded his shoulder.

“Wills, is that a person in the surf? Whoever it is seems to be going out rather than swimming in. What do you think?”

Together they peered, watching closely until an arm was raised. Then a flailing and the dot disappeared.

“I think it’s a child. Here.” He pulled free, tore off his jacket and tossed it to her. In a second his shirt came off and he’d stepped out of his trousers and shoes in one fluid movement. Another breath and he’d gone. All that remained beside her were his dropped clothes.

He’d jumped.

She quickly bent and folded the garments, hanging them over her arm and, tucking his shoes into the crook of her elbow, she hugged all of them to her chest. She stood up, her heart racing with fear as she guessed what he’d done.

Sure enough when she looked there were now two black dots in the surf, one larger than the other. Already the surf had grown and running through the waves a channel of calm water cut its way out past the breakers. Its smooth surface looked deceptively calm to anyone who didn’t know how to read the surf. This strong strip of undertow would have pulled the child out and she could see William moving across the surf, parallel with the breakers, away from the slicing strip that threatened to pick them up and carry them further out.

She hadn’t even known he could swim. Surely he must be a strong swimmer? Why else leap into climbing surf? Another hole in the knowledge she had of William’s abilities.

Alone on the cliff edge she stared in horror, realising the danger he’d put himself in and she locked her gaze on the two black dots and concentrated as hard as she could. Would it work? Anything was worth a try, because standing here, windswept and abandoned, clutching the wooden railing with her one free hand wasn’t going to be of any use to William if she didn’t try and do something. With everything to lose if it didn’t work she locked her gaze onto the spot in the roiling water where he’d been visible a second beforehand and took her consciousness into the surf to search for him.

Blogger Interview with S.L. Stacy!

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She’s one of my favorite bloggers and someone I’m excited to introduce you to.  She’s a college student but also loves to write in her free time.  Her first novel, The Fallen, a Paranormal Romance, is almost completed.  Apart from working on the novel, she also writes fan fiction.  If you want to check out some sneak peeks of The Fallen, take a look HERE to read some chapters from it.


1.  Tell me about the book you’re writing and what your plans for it are in the future.

The book I’m currently writing is tentatively called The Fallen -the working title has changed several times and will probably change again! It opens with our main character Siobhan encountering a mysterious, seriously injured man in the woods who transfers to her a kind of “super power,” I guess you could call it. She thinks he’s probably dead until he turns up as her Teaching Assistant for one of her college electives. It’s a fantasy/paranormal romance with a bit of mystery since she slowly unravels the truth about him and her connection to him. I’m enjoying writing it, but I’m not sure what my plans are for it. I will probably write some query letters once it’s done/edited while at the same time preparing to self-publish it.

2.  Coffee, tea or soda?

Coffee. I used to hate coffee, but somehow it’s become a necessity every morning. 🙂 Of course I dump cream and sugar into it….

3.  I loved with the Labyrinth movie (and always wanted Sarah’s dress) when I was kid. I thought it was interesting that you were a big Bowie fan as well. Where were you first introduced to his music or found a liking for him?

I was actually first introduced to Bowie one Christmas back in high school because they always play that duet he did with Bing Crosby on the radio (Little Drummer Boy/Peace on Earth). I had heard of him but had never realized he had such an amazing voice. (I was listening to too much pop music back then, haha!) Strangely enough I didn’t get around to watching Labyrinth until college. I love that it still has a cult following now.

4.  Why did you start blogging?

I originally started blogging to post some of my old fiction and to get back to writing some new stories, which I’ve definitely been motivated to do. But it’s also turned into me writing about books, TV shows, music and other things that I like, which has been fun, too.

5. You mention you write fan fiction. Tell me more about that.

Usually when I get an idea for a fan fiction piece, it’s usually a short romantic or sexy scene between two central characters on a TV show that I like. For some reason, I’ve really been coming up with a lot of ideas from the show Once Upon A Time (OUAT). I’ve posted a few OUAT fan fiction short stories on my blog; this summer I’m planning to post some longer ones. Although the script is sometimes cheesy, I love how none of the characters on this show are completely good or evil. I think that’s a great theme to explore in writing. Also, it gives me several bad boys to over-analyze. 😉


To top off this awesome interview, I’ll give you a tease of S.L’s novel, The Fallen.

In this excerpt Siobhan and Anna try and find out if Jasper is the same man they met long ago-the man who ‘changed’ Siobhan.

“What’s your favorite ancient culture, Jasper?” the hipster to my left asks. “What’s your favorite myth?”

“I enjoy Greek mythology the most,” Jasper replies. “In general I tend to enjoy the stories that are more obscure. My favorite Greek myth is the love affair between Ares and Aphrodite.”

“Why’s that?” a girl asks. She’s on the fringes of the group and cranes her head around the guy sitting next to her so that Jasper sees her. “I didn’t think there was much of a story there.”

“I disagree,” Jasper says smoothly. “I think that the love stories of the gods are great examples of early guilty pleasure entertainment. Aphrodite and Ares’ relationship was sexy and forbidden.”

“So what is the story?” Anna wonders, looking around the group as if she’s missing something.

“Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty, was forced to marry Hephaestus, the god of fire. Hephaestus is typically portrayed as being ugly and deformed. During their marriage, Aphrodite is unfaithful to him a number of times.”* Jasper’s silky voice is infused with an intense passion for this subject. The entire table has grown subdued, enraptured. This is the sexiest history lesson I’ve ever had.

“One of her affairs is with Hephaestus’ stepbrother, Ares, the god of war. When Hephaestus finds out, he tells Aphrodite he is going to be gone for a few days, but he sets a trap for them –a metal net that drops on Aphrodite and Ares when they’re in bed together, exposing their affair to Hephaestus and the rest of the Olympian Gods. Humiliating them.” There’s a bitter edge to these last two, more quietly spoken words. I wonder if anyone else has noticed.

A few of the others jump in with their favorite myths, although none of them captivate the group like Jasper did. Closer to eight, Anna leans toward me and whispers, “Do you want to talk after this? We can go to my place. I’ll give you a ride back later.”

“Um, sure,” I mumble back, again caught off guard.

Scattered “thank you’s” and squeaking chairs make me realize that everybody is getting ready to leave.

“I’m going to get some tea,” Anna informs me. I nod and decide to wait for her at the table. I get out my phone to text Tanya that I won’t be back until later. I think that everyone has left until I look up and see Jasper Mars standing up but lingering by the table.

I smile up at him. “Thanks for your help tonight,” I tell him to fill the silence. “I think it’s going to be a very interesting course.”

He responds with a smile of his own –a slow, deliberate smile that doesn’t show his teeth. “I hope so.” The smile disappears, and his dark, penetrating eyes seem to sweep me up and down, even though I’m still sitting. “You and Anna are looking well.” He turns on his heel and strides briskly away before I can come up with something to say.

“Ready to go?” Anna asks me, jiggling her car keys in one hand, her paper cup of tea in the other. I’m still staring at the spot Jasper has just vacated, dumbfounded.

Author Interview: Rich Voza

Welcome to another exciting author interview!

You should be super psyched about this one.  Today my interviewee is one of my good writer friends and my editing advice guru.


“More than 50% of the time, persistence wins over talent. Too many times the more talented people give up too easily, and then the less talented people get the job.”

-Rich Voza


Rich is the author of The Curse, which made it as a quarter finalist in the ABNA last year.  I think that may be the reason I first started talking to him but I can’t remember exactly.  

He lives in a house on the beach, something a lot of us dream about. He’s also a retired English teacher now turned editor and full time writer (when he isn’t spending time with his children) and writes movie reviews.  Right now he’s been working on many short stories like The Bus Stop, The Lie and The Accident but has also written several books like the Room 317 and The Curse

If you need a great editor, give him a shout out, he’s great at it and I’m sure happy to help.  He has helpful posts on grammar, so check them out.  You might learn something. Find some of those HERE and HERE.

And now onto the interview…..



1.  What is the hardest thing about writing a book (story)?

This will sound rude, but the hardest part of writing a book or story, seriously, is just time.  I have written four novels and seven short stories.  Maybe eight.  And I’ve never written anything during which I have not suddenly been hit with what seemed like a better story.  Then, I feel like I have to rush to finish what I’m currently writing so I can get to the next great idea.  I hate saying that, but it’s true.

2.  What are you currently working on?

I’m currently stuck as hell.  I have two stories that I need to revise.  They’re ready to be pitched.  But I have this fabulous idea for a really creepy stalker story.  However, if I don’t actually get something finished, queried, pitched, and all that, then I’ll remain the best writer who’s never done anything beyond his own computer.  And blog.

3.  What is the best story, in your opinion, have you ever written and why.

The best story I’ve ever written is a great story – but it’s poorly written, and I have to totally re-write it.  It’s called “The Curse,” and it’s about a slave owner who puts a curse on his slaves to prevent them from running away.  But the curse backfires on him instead of being put on the slaves.  I love it.  It was a quarterfinalist in the ABNA last year.  The readers loved the first three chapters, but I didn’t finish it well enough.

4.  As an editor, what is the grammar issue that most annoys you?

I suck at knowing when to break for paragraphs.  I know that you break when the location or the time changes, or when the speaker changes.  But sometimes there are other changes, and I get confused as to when they should be.

5.  As a reader, what do other writers do that most annoys you?

Clichés.

6.  What is your greatest strength as a writer?</h2

Dialogue.  I always get compliments on it.  The reason it’s m strength is because I talk too much and I constantly watch and observe people.  I’m  nosey as hell, watching people when they don’t realize it.

7.  What genre do you find hard to write?

Not sure because I only keep to what I know I can do.

8.  When did you write your first book?

In a way, I wrote my first book when I was in third grade.  We had a summer reading assignment, which I didn’t do.  We could have read anything, and I read nothing.  On the first day of school we had an assignment, like a book report about what we read.  I totally made mine up.  It was called “Carrot Top Mr. Mouse,” about a mouse with red hair, and the other mice made fun of him, so he ran away.  It was because I had red hair, and sometimes people made fun of me.  I think I’ll have to actually write that one day, but on that day, I made up a cover and a summary.

However, for real, my first book was “Grandpa’s Watch.”  It’s about a boy who accidentally gets sent back in time into the Civil War where his great-grandfather, as a teenager, was involved.  But the boy who gets sent back accidentally injures his grandfather.  Luckily, he knows what the old man did to help the Union win the war, and he now has to take his grandfather’s place, otherwise the South might win.  According to my daughter, it’s too educational and not enough fun.

9.  Have you ever used a pen name? (And if so did you write naughty stories?)

Yes, and yes.  But the “naughty” stories were 100% true.

10.  What is your advice for other writers?

My advice – don’t be lazy like me.  I’ve learned that there are many great writers, great stories, that nobody knows about because those writers don’t have the “drive” to get published.  That’s what I’m battling against.  For me, it’s a fear of failure.  Like, if I don’t pull the trigger, then I can’t possibly miss.  But lately I’ve been working on that.

Also, find a writers group who will read and trade feedback.  Not an online group but a real group that meets at a library or someplace.  Make sure they’re people who know what they’re doing.  I’ve been involved with writers groups in which nobody owned a computer.  I’m not trying to make fun of anyone’s money situation, but I can’t figure out how anyone can really write anything without a computer.  It would take too long.  Maybe that’s stupid, but it’s how I feel.

Also, be careful about blogging.  I just spent a year blogging very successfully.  Never had more people read what I’ve written, and got a lot of praise.  However, what I’ve been writing is nothing I could ever sell.  I spent probably 100,000 words that won’t go anywhere.  But at the same time, it’s a great confidence booster.  Now, after all that, I’ve finally learned that it’s more important to have five good people read my fiction, give me feedback, and help me improve than it is to have 100 people read something and say “Wow, that was great.”  Those 100 people are nice, but they’re not going to get me anywhere.

11.  Who would you love to co write a story with and why?

A woman I know in the Midwest because she can write stuff that I can’t, which makes sense to collaborate. (And yes, Rich, I would be awesome to write a collaborative story with. -H.N.)

Check out Rich’s blog >>HERE<<.  

I’ll leave you with one of Rich’s short stories titled, The Accident


car_crash_bmw_z8_flips_upside_down_in_germany_009

The only thing Jones had been more impressed with than his week-old BMW convertible was himself.  He had pushed the limits of time and energy, along with the art of negotiation, for three years strictly for his promotion and, more importantly, the car.  The car was now upside down at the bottom of a small grassy hill off the right shoulder of Route 295 South.  Jones stood from what seemed a very comfortable seated position in tall grass fifty yards from the car, his car, and stared in amazement to make certain it really was his car with the wheels pointing skyward like a dead turtle on its back.  The crowd of emergency personnel made it more difficult for him to see the platinum-silver car, but he could think of no other reason why he was where he was.

As he approached the car, the hairs on his right forearm prickled up as the breeze from the highway blew across where his right shirt sleeve used to be.  The rest of the starched white shirt remained, along with a bright red tie, which he loosened as he noticed another crowd uniforms gathered around something else – a body covered with a mostly white sheet except where deep red stains were soaking through where the body’s head would be.  On the ground next to the body was the white sleeve he no longer wore.

“Bastard probably never felt a thing,” said a firefighter as he removed his helmet.

“Better that way,” another replied, “when you don’t know it’s coming, no time to think.  You’re just – gone.”

Gone.  The word echoed in Jones’s head and faded like the rush of endless tires on the highway nearby.  He stumbled backwards through the tall grass as voices and flashing lights remained behind.  He dug his wallet from his left front pocket and reviewed his driver’s license just to be sure he was who he was.  The faces of his wife and kids all matched his memory as did his name and picture, and he put it all back in his pocket while taking further steps towards the woods behind him.  He turned and picked up speed until he reached a full sprint, which lasted for only a few seconds before he slowed without breath.  He dropped to one knee before curling in a fetal position and sobbing beneath the frozen arms of a family of oak trees whose spring buds were days away from exploding.  When he pulled his hands from his face a few minutes later, he noticed blood and thought of the sheet over the body back at the accident scene.

He leaped to his feet, hands held away from his body as if his own blood might contaminate him.  His eyes darted until they found the shimmer of a stream, then he walked almost primate-like across a grassy opening in the trees until reaching a bend of a tributary that strayed from the Delaware River about ten miles west.  Jones squatted, thrashing his bloody hands in the ripples before allowing the water to calm so he could see the matted hair that partially covered a gash torn open during the accident.

He felt a wave of panic that began with the men at the crash site, the sheet covering the body with the bloody head, his missing sleeve next to the sheet, and the comfort in the suggestion that maybe he never felt a thing.  After his shoulders relaxed, he stepped knee-deep into the stream and bent forward to rinse his hair of the blood and thoughts about death.

“I guess I get to keep my body.  Good thing I never filled out that donor card.”  He chuckled, forcing a smile.  “But why would I need my body?  Wouldn’t I just be more like a spirit?  Is there a reason I’m still physical?  What about-”

To read the rest of this story, click >> HERE <<

Author Interview: T.L. Andersen

Meet T.L. Andersen!

Andersen is a Secret Cravings author, writing primarily contemporary/medieval romance.  She has a few books under her belt.  Check out her books, The Sorceress of Savon and The Woodcutter King of Muladin. You can check her out via FB or Tuesday Tales as well.


1.  When did you start writing?

I’ve been writing since I could figure out that I could put words together to make a story. My Mom has stories I’ve written since kindergarten.

2.  What’s harder to write, a beginning or an end?

It’s harder for me to write the beginning. I can always tie up everything in a neat little bow. I have a hard time getting a story off the ground that catches a reader’s attention.

3.  What is the best passage you have ever written?

From The Sorceress of Savon.

“Do not tell me my fate, my lady. My fate belongs to me. It is my fate. And my fate intertwined with yours when our son was conceived in your womb. Our fate is joined together and will wrap around our son’s when he is born. And my fate is not to be king. It is to love you. Where you go, I will be. You are all I have wanted all my life. Now that I have you I will not let you go.”

4.  What is your advice to newbie authors?

Never give up. Even when it seems pointless and it seems all you are doing is spinning your wheels, never stop believing in yourself. This has been the most amazing journey and I can honestly say I have loved every little bit of it.

5.  Who is your favorite character?

Without a doubt it is Sloan O’Riley. He is the most dimensional, most intriguing character I’ve written. He is the character that lives in my head. His original model was my grandfather so I think a little piece of my grandpa lives in him.

Keep an eye out for Andersen’s Black Irish, a romance you’ll definitely want to snag a copy of.  It’s due out in May, its two sequels coming out in August and November.

Come back next week to see who my next interview will be with!  It’s someone I can’t wait for you to meet!  She’s one of my favorite ladies and I know you’re gonna love her too!