Ask An Author: What is your most effective social media platform?

Today, I’ve asked my panel of published authors the question, “What is your most effective social media platform?”

“WordPress is most effective for people to read samples of your work and get a real idea of what you write, why you write, and how you write. Twitter is most effective for getting quick attention and saying, “Hi. I have a book. Would you please read it? Thanks!”

Decker Schutt

“Facebook, with WordPress as a close second.”

S.L. Stacy

“WordPress. FB would be my second choice.”

H.N. Sieverding

“Facebook because I cheat. When I post on Facebook it also posts on Twitter. I kill two birds with one stone.”

Tricia Andersen

“I’ve found Facebook, don’t over post there otherwise you will drive perspective readers away, and Twitter to be the best. Also doing radio interviews and blogs.”

Lindsay Downs

“(facebook, twitter, wordpress, etc) Facebook, for allowing communication with readers and friends of course, although WordPress is a great tool for allowing you to improve your writing craft and connect with other writers who in some cases also become wonderfully dear friends.”

Paula Acton

Meet the Authors

If you’re an author and want to participate, too, feel free to leave your answer in the comment section. We’d love to hear it!

Ask An Author: How do you deal with bad reviews?

 

This is the first of my “Ask An Author” posts.  Today, I’ve asked my panel of published authors the question, “How do you deal with bad reviews?”. If you’re an author and want to participate, too, feel free to leave your answer in the comment section. We’d love to hear it!

 

“Shrug my shoulders and continue to be a better writer. A review, even from a professional reviewer is an opinion. Everyone is entitled to theirs even if it disagrees with yours and other reviews.”

– Lindsay Downs


“I’ve come to realize the only way to deal with bad reviews is not to read them. (Something else that’s easier said than done). If that doesn’t work: ice cream or chocolate.”

– S.L. Stacy


“First, evaluate if the reviewer has a point.  We’ve all read things we didn’t like.  If that can be true for us, then it can be true for others who read what we’ve written.  Learn from bad reviews, provided you have fairly evaluated if they are correct or at least logical.  Also, keep in mind that in order for someone to give you a bad review, they must have read your work.  That’s a positive.  And don’t be afraid to reach out to that person and thank them for reading and reading carefully.  Invite them to share any further reviews, positive or negative, with you personally.  It’ll make it more likely they’ll read more of what you’ve written.”

– Decker Schutt


“I vent to friends, treat myself (usually a cupcake), then try to learn from it.”

– Tricia Andersen


“I used to read them, but now I’ve found its better just to NOT read them.”

– H.N. Sieverding


“I have been lucky so far in one way by not having bad public reviews, but then again it is hard to actually get any reviews these days without paying lol. I think you have to learn to ignore trolls, do not reply to them but take any constructive criticism on board and learn from it.”

– Paula Acton

 


Meet the Authors