Inside the mind of a fantasy writer

Author Interview: J.H. Mull

interview2 copyReady to meet another author?  If so then you better get ready because this is going to be exciting!

image001Meet J. H. Mull!

J.H. writes in several genres so to give him a label just doesn’t cut it, so let’s just say he’s multi-genre-al.  His latest novel is Touching Home, the second book in his series about Jack Hundo Lane.

He’s currently doing research for a series he’s working on titled; Confederate Breed, based on two of his ancestors and their experiences in the Civil War and life afterward.

He lives on the Georgia coast with his wife and soul mate as well his cat, Snowflake. He’s held a variety of positions from army officer and CIA operative to stock broker and electrical engineer.

Ready to learn more about J.H.?  Well here we go…

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1.  What genre do you write and why?

I write Contemporary Fiction to Erotica and everything in between, whatever I’m interested in at the time. And I write under several pseudonyms, only recently have I published under my name–J. H. Mull.

2.  What character from a book you read or wrote would you love to meet?

Stuart Woods character Stone Barrington. My characters? Well, that’s hard, because most are based on people I know and have known.

3.  What is the best review you’ve ever gotten?

Five stars for A Captain’s Story. The reviewer said she cried at the ending.

4.  Who has been the most supportive person of your writing?

Easy, my wife and soul mate. She, an English Major from the University of Georgia, is my editor, and my biggest critic. She keeps me from having three arms in my writing or two left feet, even a foot long tongue sometimes.

5.  Do you have any other talents besides writing?

I sketch, paint, and make up stories. A young boy can have any outcome he wants in a story he constructs. Writing is my third career. The first, the U.S. Army, the second, a stock broker with several major investment firms.

6.  What is the hardest thing about writing a book?

The ground work that goes before I start writing. If one is going to write a western he best know about horses, how to saddle one, how to ride one, and what to feed one. I’m not a pantster I do an outline, a timeline, and character sketches before I start writing. But then that’s when the fun begins.

7.  Where do you find the most inspiration for your writing?

My family and my own experiences mostly. My Great…….great grandmother, Mary Elsberry, and her two sons left London with General Oglethorpe in 1732. They landed in what is now Savannah, Georgia in 1733. Her great, great grandson married a Creek Native American in 1833 and lay claim to ten thousand acres in North Georgia. He was my great, great grandfather. My family has fought in every war our country has waged since the beginning—sometime not on the winning side. I have fought for my country on three continents. Rhodesia being one place. Like I said not always on the winning side.

8.  What is the best passage you have ever written?

The best and most difficult was the paragraph describing the killing of Michelle in An Occasional Warrior. I must add, the funniest is a scene in Sex, Money, and Betrayal, describing a real estate agent having sex with a developer. She gets her foot caught under the gas pedal in his SUV as they are in his front seat, then gets her leg wedged between the seat and his door. That’s when they discover three young boys are watching.

9.  Is there any real life person/event that has inspired you to create a book/story/character?

Easy—my grandfather. What a character he was. He was born six years after Custer was killed by the Sioux at the Little Big Horn. He was a Creek Indian, scouting for General Pershing, when he went into Mexico after Poncho Vila in 1916. He was the first Indian elected sheriff in Georgia. He had five children and ran a farm, all while working as a trouble shooter for the railroad. He was a character!

10.  What is your advice for newbie authors?

Look inside yourself to see what you have to write about—write about what you know. I know this is an old thing but true. If you grew up on a ranch you know how to saddle a horse, how to ride one, and how to take care of one.

11.  How many stories have you written?

Under my own name, six. Under pen names over sixty.

12.  Who is your favorite character you’ve created and why?

It would have to be Jack Hundo Lane, who is mostly based on my experiences in the military and the intelligence service.

And to top off this interview, I leave you with a tease (like that’s a surprise 😉 ) of J.H.’s book, Touching Home.  Hope you enjoyed the interview!  Check out his book and give this post some likes to show some love.  Come on…you know you wanna!

“Ain’t no use leaning on that horn. I could hear that ratty truck of yours coming a mile off. How you doing, Patrick?” John said, coming out of the barn. The lean, wiry man, as tall as Pat, had a flat, hard stomach and grinned as he walked toward his friend, drying his hands on a well-worn cloth. His skin was dark and weathered like Pat’s. They were both Upper Creeks.

“Fine, John. You?” Pat looked at his hands. “Problem?”

“Can’t complain. I’m alive.” He held out his hand. “My mare’s having a hard time with the foal.”

“Good. Need help with the mare?”

Annie jumped down from her seat and went around to Pat, clutching his leg tightly.

“Might, but she won’t come until around midnight.” He turned his attention to Annie. “Cute kid. Ain’t yours though—whose is she?”

“No, but I’m all she’s got. Jack sent her to me. I’ll come back around then.”

“I’d appreciate the help. She ain’t his neither. How’d he come by her?”

“That young pretty veterinarian coming?”

“Yeah, but she’s a small woman. Won’t be much help if we have to pull the foal.”

“Don’t sell her short. She’s a good vet.” Pat smiled. “Jack bought the girl in Bangkok for five dollars.”

“I thought he was in Vietnam?” John took out his makings and rolled a cigarette.

“He is. Does it matter? She’s here now.”

“Guess not. Five dollars? Got a good price—that can’t be more than ten cents a pound.”

“That’s about right.”

“What’s she good for?”

“Doting over’s about all, so far.”

“Well, she’s a cute little thing. What’s your name, little sister?”

“She doesn’t speak a word of English. Somehow she seems to understand sign language.”

“Do say.” John squatted down and took out a stick of gum. He held it out and signed to Annie. She stepped forward far enough to take the gum, then moved back to Pat’s side. “Well, I’ll be damn. She’s smart.” He stood.

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