Inside the mind of a fantasy writer

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Author Reading: The Sun and the Moon

I need to do another reading like this again. If you haven’t heard/watched this video I made a while back, go and check it out! It’s Drake’s version of “the sun and the moon” from Forever Black read my me.

Ask An Author: What is your most effective social media platform?

askanauthor

Today, I’ve asked my panel of published authors the question, “What is your most effective social media platform?” Here are their answers….

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“WordPress is most effective for people to read samples of your work and get a real idea of what you write, why you write, and how you write.  Twitter is most effective for getting quick attention and saying, “Hi. I have a book. Would you please read it?  Thanks!”

-Decker Schutt

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“Facebook, with WordPress as a close second.”

– S.L. Stacy

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my lady valentine med

“I’ve found Facebook, don’t over post there otherwise you will drive perspective readers away, and Twitter to be the best. Also doing radio interviews and blogs.”

– Lindsay Downs

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“Facebook because I cheat. When I post on Facebook it also posts on Twitter. I kill two birds with one stone.”

-Tricia Andersen

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blackbloodlust2015

“For me, it’s WordPress, hands down. WP is where most of my followers are and where more people are engaged.

FB would be my second choice. Though it seems most people that follow my FB page know me in real life, so I wouldn’t say it’s been a good way for me to communicate with my readers.

I’m a big fan of  the “don’t spam your friends” on FB thing. So, I don’t post writing related things on my personal FB. If my close friends/family want to know what I’m doing writing wise, they follow/check my page.

-H.N. Sieverding

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“(facebook, twitter, wordpress, etc) Facebook, for allowing communication with readers and friends of course, although WordPress is a great tool for allowing you to improve your writing craft and connect with other writers who in some cases also become wonderfully dear friends.”

-Paula Acton

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Meet the Authors

If you’re an author and want to participate, too, feel free to leave your answer in the comment section. We’d love to hear it!

Ask An Author: What Advice Would You Give New Authors?

askanauthor

Today, I’ve asked my panel of published authors the question, “What advice would you give new authors?” Here are their answers….

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“First – Read, read, read.  Before you start a novel, read stories that might be similar.  Even if you don’t read the whole thing, just make sure what you want to write hasn’t been written already.

Read for style and content.  Notice the clichés that other writers use too much and make sure you avoid them.  If not, editors will think you’re not at all original.

Read for what you like and dislike.  For example, read books written first-person present tense and third-person past tense.  See what “feels” better to you.  I hate reading present tense, but I also know it’s very popular right now.  I don’t like reading first-person because I don’t like having to pretend I’m someone else and writing like someone else.  However, you might really enjoy the challenge it brings.

Second – know your goal.  If you want to write novels, write novels and avoid writing prompts, flash fiction, and other things that take up words that could have been added to your novel’s word count.  Years ago I was obsessed with weekly participation in a group flash fiction project.  It was very enjoyable and helped me learn to edit and revise better.  However, I spent so much time doing that each week that it took too much time away from the novel I should have been working on.

Third – avoid self-publishing until you have tried everything possible to bet published traditionally.  Too many writers opt for self-publishing, call themselves a “published author,” and then give up on trying to be published traditionally.  You could put 100 supermarket shopping lists a self-published book and legally consider yourself “published,” but would you really feel like you accomplished something significant?”

-Decker Schutt

 

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“Keep writing, no matter what! Never give up. It might be easier said than done, but it takes time to get your books out there and build an audience.”

– S.L. Stacy

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my lady valentine med

“If being a writer is your dream, then pursue it. Don’t let others discourage you. If I had I would never have known the thrill of seeing my books in the Top 100 on Amazon. Yes, every one of my regencies have achieved that status.

 Also, take workshops, either on-line or at conferences.

Develop your own writing voice.

Don’t write like someone you admire. You are your own person, write that way.

Write books you would want to read yourself.

Don’t choose the genre to write but let it choose you. That’s how I ended up writing regency.

I could go on and on but you get the gist of what I’m saying.”

– Lindsay Downs

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“Never give up. Sometimes the road is rough. Believe me, you can do this.”

-Tricia Andersen

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blackbloodlust2015

“The biggest piece of advice I can give is don’t write for money or expect to make money from your books (especially your debut novel). There are a lot of authors that will barely get out of the red after advertising, promoting, book signing, etc.

So, be prepared to fail. Be prepared to not sell a single book. Then try again. And again. And again. Never ever give up on your dream. Keep chasing it.

Which leads me to my next point. Never stop writing even if people tell you your work sucks or you don’t sell very many books. Every writer gets better and better the more they write, so you WILL always be improving, too.

Also, don’t write for other people. Write for yourself. Be unique. If you can’t get published traditionally, go ahead and self-publish. But, never put anything out there before it’s ready. It needs to be edited and polished to the best of your ability first.

-H.N. Sieverding

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“Write every day, interact with your audience via your social media and be realistic, it is going to take a lot of time and patience to get anywhere.”

-Paula Acton

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Meet the Authors

If you’re an author and want to participate, too, feel free to leave your answer in the comment section. We’d love to hear it!

Ask An Author: How do you deal with bad reviews?

askanauthor

This is the first of my “Ask An Author” posts.  Today, I’ve asked my panel of published authors the question, “How do you deal with bad reviews?”. If you’re an author and want to participate, too, feel free to leave your answer in the comment section. We’d love to hear it!

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The Answers

 

my lady valentine med

“Shrug my shoulders and continue to be a better writer. A review, even from a professional reviewer is an opinion. Everyone is entitled to theirs even if it disagrees with yours and other reviews.”

– Lindsay Downs

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“I’ve come to realize the only way to deal with bad reviews is not to read them. (Something else that’s easier said than done). If that doesn’t work: ice cream or chocolate.”

– S.L. Stacy

 

 

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“First, evaluate if the reviewer has a point.  We’ve all read things we didn’t like.  If that can be true for us, then it can be true for others who read what we’ve written.  Learn from bad reviews, provided you have fairly evaluated if they are correct or at least logical.  Also, keep in mind that in order for someone to give you a bad review, they must have read your work.  That’s a positive.  And don’t be afraid to reach out to that person and thank them for reading and reading carefully.  Invite them to share any further reviews, positive or negative, with you personally.  It’ll make it more likely they’ll read more of what you’ve written.”

-Decker Schutt

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“I vent to friends, treat myself (usually a cupcake), then try to learn from it.”

-Tricia Andersen

 

 

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blackbloodlust2015

 

“I used to read them, but now I’ve found its better just to NOT read them. But if I do accidentally read a bad one, I usually read it fifty times, cry, then want to quit writing for the night. I’ll get over it by getting a hug (or kiss) from someone who listens to me vent about it, and I go back to writing the next day.”

-H.N. Sieverding

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“I have been lucky so far in one way by not having bad public reviews, but then again it is hard to actually get any reviews these days without paying lol. I think you have to learn to ignore trolls, do not reply to them but take any constructive criticism on board and learn from it.”

-Paula Acton

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Meet the Authors

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